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Full text of "Wayside Inn front door diaries"

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COOUDGE IN ONE OF FAMOUS POSES: 
GIVING SAP BUCKET TO HENRY FORD 




A SCENE AT PLYMOUTH. VT. IN 1924 
Left to Right — Harvey S. Firestone. Mr Coolidge. Mr Ford, Thomas A. Edison 











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BOBBY, big St. Bernard dog, and Betty, prize brown hen 
turkey, have formed a unique friendship. They are owned 
by B. J. Davis of Sudbury. 



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FALSE TEETH MADE 
B Y PAUL REVERE 

Right Name Rivoire, Dean 
Miner Says in Lecture 



That Paul Revere's name was not 
really Revere, after all, but Rivoire, 
having undergone that change, 
apparently owing to the general In- 
ability of English-speaking people to 
pronounce the name Rivoire, was 
brought out in a lecture last evening 
In Lowell Institute, on the develop- 
ment of dentistry in America in the 
last 150 years by Dean Leroy M. S. 
Miner of Harvard Dental School. 

The speaker read an advertisement 
of Revere's published In a Boston 
newspaper in 1768 which read: 
"Whereas, many persons are so un- 
fortunate as to loose their Fore-Teeth 
by Accident, and otherways, to their 
great Detriment, not only in Looks, 
but speaking both in Public and 
Private -.—This is to inform all such, 
that they may have them replaced 
with false Ones, that looks as well as 
the Natural, and answer, the End of 
Speaking to all Intents, by Paul Re- 
vere, Goldsmith, near the Head of Dr 
Clarke's Wharf, Boston." 

Revere's name was Rivoire, because 
his father had been obliged to leave 
France as a Huguenot, a class then 
persecuted there. 

Dean Miner mentioned the discovery 
and earliest use of ether by a Boston 
dentist, in 1846, and the establishment 
of Harvard Dental School, the earliest 
one attached to a university in this 
country, in Boston in 1868. 














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'JANUARY »J*% -***** 
PLEASANT ^ef£s 
AND WARM 






Average Temperature ^^ ^J^u^^ 
1 Degrees Above 



Normal 



The month of January, just passed, 
was a very pleasant one despite the 
ravages of the storms of the last 
week, and came near to being a rec- 
ord month for warmth. But that 
does not mean a thing, as far at 
February and March are concerned, 
George A. Loveland, meteorologist at 
Boston, said last night. 







37 DEGREES FOR AVERAGE 

January was the third warmest in 
the history of Januaries since th« 
weather bureau records have been kept, 
a period of nearly 62 years. The av- 
erage daily tempertures was 37.9 de» / s; s> / 
grees, which was 10 degrees above nor* ^^y^ 
mal. A year ago, the second warmest 
January had a daily average temp«ra 
ture of 38.8 degrees, and the warme 
January, in 1913, had an average daily 
reading of 38.2 degrees. 

There were 10 clear days last month 
or one more than for the average Janu 
ary. There were 10 partly cloudy days, 
against a normal of nine, and 11 cloudy 
days, against a normal for January 
13 cloudy days. 




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Haptfte 3nn He tipta 




As Made From Our Own Grist Mill Products 










Old-fashioned Indian Pudding 

To one quart milk add one cup coarse corn meal and one tablespoonful salt. Steam until thick. 
Put in a baking dish adding one large tablespoonful butter and one half cup black molasses. Bake 
five hours. Beat out lumps, if any, with a wire whip. Serve with whipped cream. 

If served the second day it must be scraped from the sides of the pan and more milk and 
molasses added to make it the right flavor and consistency. It is always better the second day. 




Cracked Wheat and Rye Cereal 

1 quart Boiling Water 

1 cup Cracked Wheat and Rye Cereal 

A tbsp. Salt 

Steam in double boiler about two hours. 

Grist Mill Corn Bread 

34 qt. Corn Meal A cup Sugar 

34 qt. Pastry Flour /i cup Shortening 

H Qt. Milk 2 level tsp. Salt 

3 Eggs 6 tsp. Baking Powder 



oven. 



Bake thirty minutes in a moderately hot 
Whole Wheat Bread 



1 qt. Warm Milk 
1 Yeast Cake 

1 tsp. Salt 

2 tbsp. Brown Sugar 
V/ 2 qts. Whole Wheat 
V/ 2 qts. White Flour 

1 tbsp. Lard 

Let rise over night — form into loaves and 
bake sixty minutes in a moderate oven. 



Whole Wheat or Buckwheat Griddle Cakes 

2 cups Buckwheat 2 tsp. Baking Powder 
1 cup Whole Wheat A tsp. Salt 

Add enough sweet milk to make a thin 
batter and bake on a hot griddle. 

Corn Meal Gems 

1 cup Corn Meal 1 tsp. Salt 
1 cup Whole Wheat 1 cup Milk 
1/3 cup Sugar 1 Egg 

3 tsp. Baking Powder 1/3 cup Melted Butter 
Bake in hot oven about twenty minutes. 

Entire Whole Wheat Bread 

2%. cups Warm Water 1 tblsp. Malt 
1/3 oz. Yeast 134 tsp. Salt 

1 tblsp. Sugar 1 Egg 

6 cups Whole Wheat Flour 
3 tblsp. Melted Butter 

Mix in order given. Knead well. Let rise 
for 1 hour and cut. Let rise another hour and 
cut. _ Let it rest 45 minutes and mould. Let 
rise in pans 45 minutes or until doubled and 
bake in moderate oven 45 minutes. 



Whole Wheat Cookies 



5 oz. Butter 

3 Eggs 

1 tblsp. Milk 

1 tblsp. Molasses 

1/3 tsp. Cinnamon 

1/6 tsp. Cloves 

A tsp. Vanilla Extract 

2y 2 cups Whole Wheat Flour 

34 'cup Bread Flour 

34 cup Pastry Flour 

3 tsp. Baking Powder 

1 1/3 cup Brown Sugar 

Rind of one (1) Lemon 

Juice of J A Lemon 

At tsp. Baking Soda 

1/3 tsp. Nutmeg 

1/6 tsp. Ginger 

A tsp. Lemon Extract 

Cream well the butter and sugar, add the 
eggs, mix in well, then the remaining ingredients. 
To all this mix in gradually the combined flours 
and baking powder. Drop this batter from a 
teaspsoon onto a well greased shallow pan and 
bake in medium oven. 



Swedish Rye Bread 

2 qts. Water 

2 qts. Scalded Milk 
6 oz. Honey 

4 oz. Brown Sugar 

6 oz. Molasses 

9 lbs. Bread Flour 

3 lbs. Rye Flour 
6 oz. Yeast 

4 oz. Salt 

A oz. Ground Caraway Seed 

4 oz. Malt 

8 oz. Shortening 

Mix in order given, adding shortening last. 
Let rise 1 hour 40 minutes. 2nd punch 40 minutes 
later. Rest 10 minutes. Mould into loaves. 

Bran Muffins 

VA cup Pastry Flour 

V/2 cup Bran 

1 tsp. Brown Sugar 

X A tsp. Blackstrap Molasses 

4 tblsp. Melted Butter 

3]^2 tsp. Baking Powder 

About VA cup Milk 

1 Egg 

2/3 tsp. Salt (level) 

Sift together flour, salt and baking powder. 
Blend with this the bran and add to these dry 
ingredients the mixture of milk, beaten egg, sugar 
and fat and molasses. Fill muffin tins about 2/3 
full and bake in moderate oven about At hour. 



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POEM RECITAL, FINE ARl^ 

The Pine Arts Theatre will present 
Miss Edythe Reeves MacLean in a reci- 
tation of Henry Wadsworth Long- 
fellow's famous poem, "Robert of 
Sicily" at 3 P. M. today preceding the 
showing of "Der Kongress Tanzt." She 
will give this recitation to the accom- 
paniment of a special music score writ- 
ten by Rossiter Cole. William Ellis 
' Weston will be at the piano. Miss 
■ MacLean is a resident of Cambridge 
and a graduate of the Emerson school 
of oratory. 



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The old-time fashion of tablets of 
candy encircled with mottoes, with which 
many citizens now of advanced 
s ;i mused their boyhood or girlhood 
long ago, seems to have returned. Such 
mottoed candles, particularly in the form 
of hearts, at this Valentine moment, are 
passed around after a tea, a supper, or 
even a dinner. Like the similar mottoes 
that were In vogue in the 1850's and 
1860's, these little inscribed missives on 
the candied tidbits are impertinent. In 
point of slang and suggestion they are 
brought down to date— that is all "their 
difference from the bygone days. The 
young lady of the period, fresh from 
Radcliffe or Wellesley, gets a little candy 
heart inscribed with the message, "You 
i swell kid." And perhaps she re- 
sponds with the message, "What is your 
t now?" In those bygone times a 
pretentious youth would read on his 
candy tablet, "Does your mother know 
you're out?" And sometimes the mes- 
sage would be of a very intimate sort, 
such as "You're the darling of my 
heart," or even, "Name the day." Pro- 
posals were even made, to be sealed bv 
after events, by these Impertinent 
"mottoes." 



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MRS. EMMA R. WELLMAN 

[Special Dispatch to The Herald] 
WELLESLEY, Feb. 15— Funeral ser- 
vices for Mrs. Emma R. Wellman, 
widow of Edward W. Wellman, and 
mother of Gordon Boit Wellman, as- 
sociate professor at Wellesley College, 
who died at her home, 14 Birch road, 
after a brief illness, will be at 10:45 A. 
M. Friday at the home, with burial in 
Forest Dale cemetery, Maiden. 

Mrs. Wellman was born in Cambridge 
daughter of Charles R. and Rebecca 
J. Boit Patch. Her husband was with 
the Congregational Sunday School and 
Publishing Society of Boston until his. 
death in 189L She leaves her son and 
a daughter, Miss Ruth W. Wellman, of 
Wellesley. 






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Before an audience numbering well 
over a hundred members of the Win- 
chester Fortnightly, Mr. Arthur H. Hay- 
ward, president of the Rushlight Club, 
gave a most Interesting talk on Friday, 
Feb. 10, upon the subject of early light- 
ing. Invited guests Included Mr. Charles 
L. Woodslde, pioneer collector and re- 
search worker and his equally noted 
daughter, Lura Woodslde Watklne, ex- 
pert on Cambridge glassware. Members 
also brought pieces from their homes to 
discuss and to seek information about 
during the informal question and answer 
period after the lecture. Mr. Hayward 
brought, as illustration, a great many 
rare pieces from his own collection, re- 
ferring to them In the course of his talk 
upon a subjeot in which he was a pion- 
eer, -having begun his Investigations a 
quarter of a century ago. 

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MAPLE SAP NOWJtUNNiriG 
IN HILLS OF BERKSHIRES 

PITTSFIELJ), Feb 21— The maple : 
sap is running in the Berkshire Hills.- j 
That is the report of Samuel R. Mor- i 
rison, superintendent of Brookvale I 
Farm on Berkshire Trail in Windsor 
owned by Z. Marshall Crane. 

Mr Morrison claims the honor of | 
being the first to report a run and I 
he says that a commercial run is ! 
expected within 10 days. Because of 
the scant amount of snow in the woods 
and frost in the ground he does not 
expect a heavy run nor a long one 
this year. Already the flow is from 
to 55 drops per minute against an 
average of 60 drops per minute, he 
says. Brookvale plans to operate only 
2000 buckets this year against 2800 
in normal times. 



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A rare and seldom used photograph of George Wash- 
ington. It is now in museum of the University of Virginia. 
For many years it was owned by the Custis' family. 







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A PUZZLE 

Professor William Lyon Phelps of 
Yale told his Boston audience on 
Saturday that he had been unable 
to make up his mind as to the truth 
of the allegations in the new book of 
his ex-pupil, Sinclair Lewis. The 
book, "Anne Vickers," is an expose 
of the prison system in America. 

On the day the professor finished 
"Anne Vickers," with its savage 
arraignment of prisons, he received a 
letter from another ex-pupil of , his 
who had just completed a prison 
term. This Yale man was quite en- 
thusiastic over prison life. He said 
the food was good, he had plenty of 
time for reading, and also there were 
d. couple of Harvard men behind the 
bars with whom he enjoyed many 
bridge games. 

No wonder the professor is 
puzzled as to which pupil to believe 
— the man who has been in jail or 
the one who hasn't been. 

















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AGED SUDBURY 
WOMAN DIES 

Miss Ellen O. Clark 

Was 89; End Comes 

Suddenly 



Sudbury, I'd... .dry 23— MIbh Kl- 

iea U. C1UIK, 6'J, t»UO Jl LUC U061 

kiiowu wouiuu iu luis Sbdiuu, Uieu 
suuuoniy yosicruay UluiUUlg, wuue 
eating nui urt>dKiutsL. tone nad re- 
ceiuiy made a remarkauio recov- 
eiy iroui a severe cat>e ol pneu- 
monia. Willi ner bisiei, Miss _ilni:- 
ra Liaike, di years ot age, sue 
lived in tue olu uoniesiead origin- 
aliy buili in ltriu and remodelled 
m ll'Ju. luis sister survives aer 
auu is tue lasi meniuer ol lue iain 

.Miss Clark, lor more than 40 
year« a scuool leaehcr, taugnt in 
Acion, Ldtilcton, Sudbury, and 
Hampton intitule, Virginia, serv- 
ing lor many years in tUe latter 
institute, bue wa« chaplain ol 
v\aysicio inn Chapter, u. A. it., 
since its inception many years ago. 
bhe was an active memuor ol me 
Unitarian church and ol' the Alli- 
ance. Sue possessed a keen and 
ready wit and retained mosi ot 
lier iaculties up to the time ol ner 
parstsimg. 

The sisters were inseparable; 

1 they never missed attending 
church on Sunday and frequently 
walked long distances together. 
Recently they were tendered a 

[dinner party at the Wayside inn 
ami a icception by the badies' Al 
liance. More than 100 gueste 
thronged their home recently when 
Miss Elmira observed her 92nd 
birthday anniversary. 











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To Honor Memory of 

Crispus Attucks on Mar. 6 

.J u '; suant to the issuance of the Bos- 

erno^ r-^f ' e V, ay "r^Iamation by Gov! 

fL^'iift 8 for , the observance 
01 Jiaicii o in honor of the "first mar 

dence'" th tL CaU NV f ^SL^USS- 
uence, .the National Equal Rights 

unite iellow-martvrs will k i i, 

gay. itasswa ffjg, as « 

* .!P ecia » l>wtorical leaflet for return 
letter postage in connection with th* 
request of Governor Ely in hfc^cla! 
mation that "teachers of our mhf, 
schools duly commemorate the day" ii 
bert G. Wolff, Old South Building loc , 
league president, and William m,,, 1 
Trotter, 5G Pemberton square national 
P»^t e sec ' etary ' are distributors of t "fe 
Urvance 1 managers of th * Boston ob! 














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TRACES HISTORY OF 
THE HADLEY CHEST 

Rev C. F. Luther Addresses 
Genealogical Society 

"The Hadley Chest," a type of re- 
ceptacle 'for bed linen made and much 
used in the Connecticut Valley between 
Deerfield and Middletown, for 40 years, 
beginning shortly before 1700, was the 
subject of a talk yesterday afternoon 
at, the meeting of the New England 
Historic Genealogical Society. 

The speaker, Rev C. F. Luther of 
Amherst, has for years carried on 
much research in regard to the origin 
and evolution of this type of chest and 
has catalogued 94 of them now exist- 
ing. He declared it received its name 
within the last half-century, owing to 
the fact that a fine specimen had been 
bought in Hadley by a rich collector, 
who afterward called it "my Hadley 
chest." 

These chests, elevated eight or 10 
inches on four legs, had two large 
drawers, one above the other, and over 
them the chest proper with a cover 
that lifted. Their total height, judg- 
ing by the photographs, was about 
four feet. 

They were usually made of pine, pan- 
eled in front and decorated here and 
there with a conventionalized tulip 
with leaves, which formed the distin- 
guishing detail of that particular type. 
There are 10 such chests within a seven 
or eight-mile radius of Boston, three 
of them in the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts, according to the speaker. 

He had been unable, he stated, to 
^nd the tulip and leaf design of the 
Hadley chest on any existing early 
English chest, but he had found one 
strongly resembling it in a representa- 
tion of an English wainscoting of 400 
years ago. 

There is evidence, Mr Luther said, 
that this particular type of chest, al- 
most always with the tulip ornamenta- 
tion cut out with a small gouge, was 
made in a number of towns along the 
Connecticut Valley, including Spring- 
field, as well as Hartford, Conn. 

From old records found in Hadley 
he believed it probable that Allis & 
Belding, carpenters and builders, who 
sometimes did cabinet work, and In 
whose families eight of the chests wer» 
owned, may have been the earliest 
makers of them in Hadley. 

John Carroll Chase presided at tk* 
meeting. 







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Farm and Garden 

Association 

to Meet 

The New England Farm and 
Garden Association, Inc., is holding 
its annual meeting tomorrow at the 
College Club, Commonwealth ave. 
The meeting is called for 10:30 
a. m. and Mrs. Harold Murdock, 
the president, will preside. 

Reports of the various' local com- 
mittees will be followed by those 
of the outlying units. Of special 
interest will be a report by Mrs. 
Katherine Stout of Orange County, 
Vt., on her experiences in raising 
Mallard ductfs. 

After the election of officers, 
Miss Juliet Richardson will speak 
on the need of preservation of our 
wild flowers. Mrs. James M. Newell, 
Jr., will usher at the meeting, as- 
sisted by Mrs. Benjamin A. G. 
Thorndike, Mrs. William D. Tay- 
lor and Mrs. Channing Swann. 

A luncheon will be served, at 
which Mrs. James M. Newell will 
officiate as hostess, assisted by 
Mrs. Irving Wright, Mrs. John 
Ramsey, Mrs. Edward R. Nash, 
Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Mrs. 
George U. Crocker and Mrs. Roger 
Converse. 

Later, at 7 o'clock, a dinner has 
been arranged by the executive 
committee of the association for 
the visiting members, after which 
Mrs. Ira Rich Kent will show her 
unique set of flower portraits, and 
Miss Edith Bullock will give a pro- 
gram of monologues. 



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Lynn Pastor 





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REV. DR. WILLIAM W. ROSE 

W**r *\A Warciv - ^ 

LYNN CHURCH TO MARK 
CENTENARY WEEK 

The First UniversaUst Church of 
Lynn will being centenary week with 
two services tomorrow, the first at 10:30 j 

A. M., when the sermon will be 
preached by the pastor, the Rev. Dr. 
William Wallace Rose, and the dedi- 
catory prayer read by the Rev. Dr. Lee 
S. McCollester, and the second at 4 
P. M. when the commemorative address 
will be by President John S. Cousens of 
Tufts College. At the latter service 
Miss Ellen Mudge Burrill will read an 
historical paper. The music will be by 
the Lynn Choral Society, with Arthur 

B. Keene conducting. The church is on 
Nahant street, near Broad. 









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